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For New Jersey and New York Metro homeowners thinking about upgrading their homes with high-performance, custom-built replacement windows, choosing a style may be the easiest decision they make, or the hardest. Some people are happy with the way their home looks, but are tired of their home’s drafty corners and high heating and air conditioning bills. Simply replacing their existing double- or single-hung windows with a modern, better functioning window of the same style could be the perfect solution. Other homeowners want to make a more dramatic change, perhaps replace some operable window with fixed windows, or go back with a beautiful bay window to replace the picture window.

We’ve talked about the different styles available in past articles, but this week we wanted to do a one-to-one comparison of two styles to give you an in-depth look at the differences and similarities among styles. If you’re looking for crank-out style windows, this article will help you decide which one is best for your home.

Casement Replacement Windows vs Awning Replacement Windows

While both casement windows and awning windows crank out, and allow homeowners circulate air through their homes, there are some definite differences. The most obvious, is that awning windows are hinged at the top and create a little ledge that prevents rain from getting indoors, even when the windows are opened wide. Casement windows are hinged along one side, so they open wide to usher in ample air, but it wouldn’t be wise to open the windows fully during a rain shower.

Differences Between Casement and Awning Windows

Both styles are excellent options for places where you would have to reach over a counter or sink since they usually have a single lever (crank) positioned near the bottom of the window unit. Neither window style is a great solution near a sidewalk or deck since they open outward which can block traffic patterns or interfere with furniture placement when open. And, although you can generally clean both surfaces of a casement window from the inside, you may need to go outdoors to clean the exterior surface of your awning replacement windows. Awnings are great installed high on basement walls and in narrow hallways with limited space.

Casement Windows Benefits

There are a number of reasons that casement windows are popular. Casement windows almost equal the energy-efficiency of fixed windows because the design provides an exceptional seal that blocks air and moisture leaks. And, you get the added benefit of emergency egress that picture windows don’t offer. Many people say this style is the best at capturing a refreshing breeze to air out your home. Casements offer a large viewing area, so if you have a stunning garden or spectacular view beyond your window, you may want to opt for casement windows over other styles.

By the way, you don’t have to open a casement window all the way to get abundant air flow, so you can use window guards to keep little ones safe inside and still get the same ventilation as you would if you cranked one open all the way. Like awning windows, casements open out, so you have to be selective about where you install them to avoid blocking the walkways. But, since you can clean both glass surfaces from inside your home, casement windows are great options for all floors in your home, even in rooms where you might not want an awning style.

Awning windows are usually wider than they are tall and casement windows are usually taller than they are wide. They both make great side-lites for smaller fixed windows. And, when a row of casement windows is joined beneath a fixed window, you have a beautiful arrangement that is energy-efficient, provides plenty of fresh air and still gives you a full view of the scenery outdoors.

Pros and Cons of Crank Style Replacement Windows

Crank style windows are terrific in tight spaces and where you would normally have to climb a ladder to raise a window, or where you have to reach across a counter. Both awnings and casements really bring in a ton of fresh air, but you can open an awning window in a light rain. Casement windows are often better than awnings in upper floors and neither style is a great fit if you have shrubbery close to the house, or want to place furniture close to the house on your patio.

Renewal by Andersen of New Jersey & New York Has Replacement Window Styles For Your Home

Whether you love the great energy-efficient qualities of casements or you love to open your windows when a gentle rain is falling, we’ve got styles and prices to satisfy you. Need more information about these and other replacement window styles perfect for your New Jersey or New York Meto home? Just take a minute to fill in the short form on this page or give us a call toll-free at 1-888-826-2451.

Check out these posts for more information on Awning, Casement, Hopper and Sliding replacement windows:

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