4 Tips to Pick Replacement Windows for Your Older Home in NJ & NY

windows for older homes new jersey new york

Do you own or recently purchase an older home in New Jersey or New York? Thinking about updating the windows, but aren’t sure which replacement windows you should buy? Of course, “older home” is a really broad category. Older might mean your house was built 30 to 50 years ago. Or, it might be a historic home in a preservation district. Many people equate condition with age, which isn’t always a valid measurement. At Renewal by Andersen of New Jersey and New York Metro, we advise homeowners to think beyond age and consider context when deciding which styles and features are the best fit for their home.

How Do You Decide Which Replacement Windows You Should Buy For Your Home?

Deciding which replacement window you should buy for your home doesn’t have to be a decision made alone. Working with a window manufacturer and dealer you trust helps you make informed decisions. Over the past 25+ years working with area homeowners, we’ve learned that well-informed customers are usually more satisfied than consumers feel pressured to buy certain styles or add certain accessories to get the best price. We put together these four tips to get you started on the journey toward updating your older home.

Tip #1: Decide What You Expect from Your Windows

We know that the best replacement window is the one that meets your needs. Setting realistic goals helps ensure you’ll be satisfied with the outcome after the installation crew has tidied up and left you to start enjoying your brand new windows. Here are a couple of examples that show you how to fine-tune your wish list.

  1. Are you looking for a window that will block harsh sunlight? Look for glass manufactured with technology that reduces the glare that passes through the pane, without distorting the view or darkening your indoor spaces.
  2. Do you want your windows to stand out from the rest of your home? Choose replacement windows with a wider frame, such as casement windows, or consider replacing a picture window with a beautiful bay configuration to draw the eye to a specific area of your home. If you want a low profile and a larger viewing area, sliding windows and fixed windows are a better option.

Tip #2: Create Realistic Expectations

By creating realistic expectations, you’ll be better prepared when the time comes to design your home windows. All homes built before the 1930s were appointed with single-pane windows. Owning an eighty- or ninety-year old home with original windows means that you’ll definitely want to choose a double-pane window. Even if you are renovating a historic home, unless you are bound by a grant provision or other regulation to maintain exact replicas, choose insulated windows with two panes and gas between the glass, or prepare to spend way more than you have to one heating and air conditioning bills.

Tip #3: Clearly Define Your Vision

Some brick homes built in the 1940s and 1950s have recessed windows. In many of these homes the trim and frame are painted the same color as the exterior finish – making them almost fade into the background. To maintain the original aesthetic, you’ll want to replace your windows with a style that has a comparable frame width. You can choose a different window style if you want to accentuate your windows. For example, you might replace sliding windows with a double-hung or casement window. Download the Renewal by Andersen app to see how different styles affect the overall appearance of your home. By defining your vision, you help your window consultant guide you toward specific styles, grille patterns, glass types and color choices. Of course, the final decision is always yours.

Tip #4: Identify Underlying Challenges

Older homes with aging windows may also have outdated heating and air conditioning systems. Antiquated systems often required a window be opened to allow gas fumes or excess moisture to escape. Modern systems are designed to self-vent and recirculate indoor air. Windows play an integral part in maintaining healthy indoor air quality and temperature. When deciding what ratio of inoperable and operable windows to have in an older home, always consider the overall condition of your home, the age and performance of your heating and air conditioning systems and other factors that may contribute to high indoor humidity levels.

Learn Which Renewal by Andersen Replacement Windows Are a Perfect Fit for Your New Jersey or New York Metro Home

Updating an older New Jersey or New York home with modern, energy-efficient replacement windows is a unique journey that should be approached with intentional planning. Fortunately, the Renewal by Andersen of New Jersey and New York Metro replacement window team has experience helping consumers design home windows and doors to complement every architectural style. To learn more, just complete the short form on this page or give us a call at 1-888-826-2451 to schedule a free, no-obligation consultation in the privacy of your own home.

 

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LEARN …
    • The Difference Between Replacement and New Construction Windows!
    • The Different Kinds of Frame Materials and What That Means to Your Windows’ Performance and Longevity!
    • How the Right Glass Can Save You Money on Your Heating & Cooling Bills!
    • The Critical Role Proper Installation Plays in the Performance, Durability and Warranty of Your New Replacement Windows!
    • What Features and Options are Important to You and What Role They Play in Your Ultimate Satisfaction Today, and for as Long As You Live in Your Home!
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